Alternative social media platforms

I love the promise of social media platforms, but I’m not thrilled about the most popular options, which means I take notice when I hear about interesting alternatives.

Here are a few I’ve bookmarked.

Subreply

Subreply was created by Lucian Marin from the desire of having a simple to use, English-only, global and public forum that has nothing in common with ancient and untrustworthy social networks.

I love Subreply’s simplicity. I love that it is entirely text-based—no photos, videos, or link previews. It is what I wish Twitter was. Sadly, it suffers from the same problem as other alternative platforms—namely, your friends aren’t on it.

Haven

Self-host a private blog instead of using Facebook.

Haven puts you in complete control of what you write. You choose who gets to see it instead of trusting a big company to control who gets access on your behalf. Share pictures of your kids with family and friends. Share private thoughts with those you trust most. You’re in control with no ads, and no tracking.

Haven is open source, and free for you to run on your own server. We’ve made it as easy as possible to get running on Amazon AWS and you can run it on a Raspberry Pi in your living room or anywhere else. If running it yourself is too daunting, we can host it for you on your own dedicated virtual server for $5 per month.

Haven is my favorite concept for a social media alternative, but it will likely never be mainstream because people can’t use it to get attention.

Uhuro

Meet UHURO, the new decentralized social network built on email protocols! A fresh start that puts you in control of your data and can’t be government controlled or spied upon, the way it should be! Your timeline is your email inbox.

Though it may sound strange, I like email. I prefer communication over email more than any social media platform. Is it truly private? That claim is a reach.

Slow Social

Slow Social was founded to create a space for people who want more connection, not attention, when using a social app. While many existing social apps ask How do we retain the users attention?” we ask How can we help facilitate friendships?”

How it works: (1) Post at most once a week; (2) Read your friends’ posts once a week; (3) Chill.

Personally, I would allow one post per day, but I like what Slow Social is trying to do.

Joenly

Joenly is a new social network where you can’t post by yourself. 1. Record a video or take a photo 2. Send to a friend 3. He replies 4. Post is published on both your profiles. Only available on iPhone for now.

Similar to Slow Social, Joenly is a great concept, though I’m always partial to text. Why does it have to be a video or photo?

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